Our Three Cs

The Coalition for Collaborative Care is a national partnership of 50 organisations, all committed to a better deal for people with long-term conditions and their carers. C4CC believes this can be achieved through people, organisations and communities working together on the ‘three Cs’.

three-cs-greyscale
Better conversations
between the health professional and the people they support.

Growing strong communities and people’s personal and social networks.

Co-production – involving people, families and communities as equal partners at every stage of decision-making, commissioning, service design and delivery.
The Coalition for Collaborative Care grew out of work by a number of organisations that were looking at what needed to happen in practice to achieve person-centred, collaborative care. These three Cs were found to be essential.

Conversations: We need to enable meaningful conversations between people living with long-term conditions and those involved in supporting their health and care. This is sometimes summarised as moving from asking ‘What is the matter with you?’ to asking ‘What matters to you?’ Care and support planning and health coaching are key methods of achieving this.

Community: It has been estimated that people with long-term conditions typically spend around four hours a year with health and care services. For the other 8,760 hours, they are managing their condition in everyday life, in their community. The evidence for the importance of social networks and supportive communities for health and wellbeing is indisputable. Growing strong communities and people’s personal and social support networks are vital for health and wellbeing. This includes promoting peer-support, support for self-management, working with the voluntary sector and an organisational focus on community development to build bottom up approaches to health ‘creation’.

Co-production: At all levels it is vital that people with long-term conditions are worked with as equal partners in co-designing and often co-delivering services and support. We can only achieve change if people, families and communities are involved at every stage of decision-making, commissioning, service design and delivery. Co-production involves sharing power and recognising that people with ‘lived experience’ have a hugely important contribution to make as they are living with their conditions 24/7.

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