Achieving Personalisation for People Affected by Dementia

With the NHS Five-Year Forward View and the Care Act driving the personalisation agenda into the mainstream, there is an increased need to focus on how to achieve this meaningfully and consistently in the context of budget cuts and other pressures.

Whilst many recognise the benefits of personalisation, there is still work to be done in making it real for people and we hope that this tool can help provide consistency in the approach used by professionals involved in care and support planning for people affected by dementia.

Progress front coverThis tool can be used by anyone organising individual support packages. It highlights good practice and shows areas where possible improvements are needed, while acknowledging that people and organisations won’t all be starting from the same place.

By adopting a ‘no blame-no excuse’ approach, the tool can be an unthreatening way for staff and teams to explore their current practice against practical benchmarks and find ways to improve their performance incrementally.

People with dementia consistently tell us that they want choice and control over decisions about them, for services to be designed around them and to feel valued as part of a community. We know that person-centred conversations lead to better individual outcomes and we hope the practicability of this tool can lead to transformational change across the dementia landscape.

Personalisation is at the heart of what Alzheimer’s Society do and within my team in particular, we are working to achieve this for people affected by dementia.  We are committed to modeling our own practice around the approaches detailed here. Through our partnerships with local authorities, CCGs and other organisations we will seek to ensure all people affected by dementia get the best care and support available to deliver what is most important to them.

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