Category Archives: News

Leadership for Empowered and Healthy Communities Programme – recruiting now!

Following the continued success of the Leadership for Empowered and Healthy Communities programme, new dates have been announced for the next cohort.

This innovative programme explores how leaders can grow and nurture capacity in local communities to improve health and wellbeing and ensure better outcomes for people living with long-term conditions, disabled and older people.

The programme is aimed at senior leaders and clinicians across health, social care and beyond who want to be part of a movement for change. Participants will be encouraged to think radically about the role of ‘social capital’ in health and social care and the role of public service leadership in shaping the communities that citizens need and want.

The programme involves a series of one-day workshops, action learning sets, one-to-one leadership coaching sessions, a Myers-Briggs (MBTI) analysis of personality style and a specialist 360 degree feedback diagnostic. Participants will have the opportunity to learn about best practice as well as developing the leadership skills required to embed co-production into organisations and enable strong and empowered communities to grow and flourish.

The programme, which kicks off in July 2017, is a joint venture between C4CC, Thames Valley and Wessex NHS Leadership Academy, Skills for Care, Think Local Act Personal, ADASS and the Local Government Association.

The New Economics Foundation’s evaluation of the 2012 programme found, “The leadership course was regarded in positive terms unanimously by those that attended. It was described as “excellent”, “inspirational” and perhaps most crucially, has already led to new leadership behaviours in those attending.” It also found the fact that, “…most of those who attended the course had already begun to transform their role or services is evidence of the extent to which the course inspired.”

The dates are:

6th July 2017
28th September 2017
9th and 10th November 2017 (residential)
24th January 2018
14th March 2018

To find out more, including dates for webinars / virtual learning, please click here.

To register your interest please email: Harmeet Bhatia at harmeet.bhatia@lehc.org.uk

C4CC’s Perspective on the Five Year Forward View Delivery Plan

Catherine Wilton, Director and Fiona Carey, Co-Chair of the Coalition for Collaborative Care, offer the partnership’s perspective on the new Five Year Forward View Delivery Plan:

Since the Five Year Forward View (FYFV) was published two and a half years ago, the Coalition has been working together with our 50 national partners to effect change at pace and scale across the whole health and care system, to provide a better deal for people with long-term conditions and their carers.

At the heart of our approach has been the ‘Three Cs’ of better conversations, building community capacity and co-production.  For people with long-term conditions this means a new relationship with the NHS – in which people have the opportunity to have a conversation about what matters to them and what good looks like, to explore the assets and supports they have available to them – among their family, friends and local communities – and to plan and coordinate with healthcare professionals the services and treatments they might need to ensure they get the best possible outcomes.  It also means NHS organisations behaving differently – actively supporting and working with local people and communities to build community resilience and to co-design the supports that people want.

The original ‘Chapter Two’ of the FYFW championed the importance of empowering people and communities, and while it doesn’t have a separate chapter in the new Delivery Plan, many of our partners know that to make the plan become a reality, the NHS needs to fully embrace the power of people and communities.  ‘Health’ is not just created by health services – it happens when people are able to take control of their own lives and have a voice in what needs to happen locally to support them, on a one-to-one, and on a collective, level.  It is great therefore that the delivery plan has recognised the need for Sustainability and Transformation Partnerships to develop the concept of and collective action for ‘Health Creation’, as advocated by NHS Alliance. 

Having access to health and care services is vitally important but it is the quality of conversations between people and professionals that will ensure the best outcomes for people with long-term conditions.  The RCGP have stated that it is a ‘necessity’ for care and support planning to become core business for general practice, as it is an effective way to support people with multiple long-term conditions.  And they believe it is so important that they have made it part of the RCGP curriculum, meaning that to qualify as a GP, new recruits will have to know the principles and have the skills to do care and support planning.  Over the coming year we will be working very closely with the RCGP and other C4CC partners to roll out care and support planning – not only is it the right thing to do for people themselves, we believe that it can reduce the pressure on acute services for two reasons – because people are able to look after themselves better, and better coordinated care is more efficient.

There are huge challenges facing health and care over the coming years but we also share the optimism of the delivery plan that a better and more effective NHS can be delivered. We strongly believe that a people- and community-centred vision of collaborative care, delivering the ‘Three Cs’ is the best way to build an NHS fit for the 21st Century and one that will continue to sustain us all in the future.

C4CC’s Co-production Team View 

Sue Denmark from C4CC’s Co-production Team reflects on what this means for people.

“As someone with multiple long-term conditions, I was glad to see GPs getting the recognition they deserve as I all too aware of how important they are. The increase in their numbers is good to see, but I did feel there was something missing around the quality of the conversation between the professional and the person – more access is great, but we need to ensure care and support coming from the time together is person-centred.

“I was also pleased to see such a focus on mental health and the increase in talking therapies, but I did feel this could have gone a step further, looking at how community-based services could provide support, in a different way to medical treatment.

“I know from my own personal experience how community-based groups and activities can contribute to a person’s health and wellbeing. A few years ago, myself and others needing regular leg treatments worked together with our GP practice to create our own group and receive our care there instead of making appointments. The group, simply by its existence, began to tackle other wider issues such as isolation and loneliness – friendships made there led to walking groups and learning new skills. This has helped to improve people’s physical and mental health and reduced pressure on the GP practice.

“Reading this plan, I was unsure how I as a person fitted in to it, but having considered it, I think we can help by taking the lead on looking at our own communities and helping to fill in any gaps with local, tailored solutions. This, together with the work of NHS England, will start to deliver real change where it is needed.”

Job Opportunity – Head of Business Development with Spice Time Credits

There is an exciting opportunity to join the Spice Time Credits team as their Head of Business Development.

As part of Spice’s Senior Leadership Team (SLT), you will help drive Spice’s scaling strategy. Leading a motivated Business Development, Communications and Marketing Team, with a focus on securing funding from national initiatives, local authorities, CCGs, foundations, trusts and corporate partners, as well as leading Spice external communications and marketing initiatives. Working closely with the Chief Executive Officer, SLT, Trustees and wider organisation to drive the growth of Spice’s offer, you will also have an important role in visioning and designing the future of Spice working with existing and potential clients to ensure that they remain at the cutting edge of community development, public sector reform, preventative health and time banking.

Spice began as a start-up eight years ago and has now grown to a team of more than 40 people, with offices in Cardiff and London, and programmes in five regions of England and Wales – their turnover has grown more than five-fold, reaching over 33,000 participants.

The location of the role is flexible, with a starting salary of £43,000, with London weighting where applicable. Deadline for applications is 9am on Monday 3 April, with interviews taking place on Tuesday 11 April, in London.

You can find out more about Spice here, and to find out more about the role, and to apply, click here.

Engaging and Empowering Communities: a shared commitment and call to action

C4CC partner, Think Local, Act Personal launched  a commitment and call to action on Engaging and Empowering Communities at National Children & Adults Services Conference in Manchester on Wednesday 2 November 2016.

Engaging and Empowering Communities: A Shared Commitment and Call to Action provides a persuasive case for working collaboratively to create strong and empowered communities, which is a key aspect of the Coalition’s ‘three Cs’.

The Coalition for Collaborative Care co-authored the commitment, together with other system leaders including ADASS, Association of Directors of Public Health, Department of Health, Health and Care Voluntary Sector Strategic Partnership, Local Government Association, the new NHS Alliance, NHS Confederation, NHS England, Public Health England, Skills for Care and Think Local Act Personal.

You can download the full commitment here: http://www.thinklocalactpersonal.org.uk/Latest/Engaging-and-Empowering-Communities-a-shared-commitment-and-call-to-action/

Further details, including the press release and where to go for more information can be found below.

For the first time, care leaders are offering a clear way of making sure that community centred approaches are embedded in health and social care services. The clear set of principles and actions are launched today by the Think Local Act Personal Partnership on the first day of the annual National Children & Adults Services Conference in Manchester.

Engaging and Empowering Communities: A Shared Commitment and Call to Action offers a compelling case for working collaboratively to create strong and empowered communities, and for this to be central to the transformation of the health and care sector.  It’s co-authored by all national health and care system leaders including The Association of Directors of Adult Social Services, Coalition for Collaborative Care, Local Government Association, Public Health England, Association of Directors of Public Health, the Department of Health and NHS England.

The report was produced following a National Leaders’ Seminar on community and citizen empowerment, attended by NHS England Chief Executive Simon Stevens, which called for national agencies to work together in realising the policy ambitions of the Care Act and Five Year Forward View.

The report argues for the need to build strong and inclusive communities that can address persistent health and wellbeing inequalities. Key principles and broad actions are set out with a commitment from key partners to develop a detailed plan to support practical actions on the ground.

Kate Sibthorp and Clenton Farquharson, members of TLAP’s National Co-production Advisory Group, said: “A better life for me is just common sense. What we need is for this collaboration to result in all the parts of the system working together to help better lives be a common experience for everyone who use health, care and support services. People who work in this area need to be reminded that knowing you should do something about it is not the same as actually doing something about it. Organisations need to create the conditions for this shared commitment to work, and central to this is having good relationships so we can all work together to support practical action on the ground.
We welcome this report whole-heartedly and hope it will inspire genuine commitment to working with people and communities. We look forward to hearing and sharing lots more stories of how people are achieving their best health and well-being, both physical and emotional, through this approach.”

Alex Fox, CEO of Shared Lives Plus and Think Local, Act Personal’s board lead for building community capacity, said:
“There have always been aspects of our lives, such as the health of our lifestyles or how connected we feel to others,  that have a huge impact on our health and wellbeing and long term use of services. At a time when budgets are more and more stretched, the organisations and resources outlined in the shared commitment will show the help that is out there for hard-pressed commissioners in working with people who use services to develop the health and care system we  need, rather than manage the one we have.”

Lynda Tarpey, Director of Think Local Act Personal, said:
“There is clear consensus amongst sector leaders that people and communities must be central to the redesign of care and other public sector services, using approaches that go beyond traditional statutory interventions.  Increasing evidence from research and practice demonstrates that building community and helping people to develop social networks has the potential to address wellbeing, improve outcomes as well as more effectively apportion limited public finances”.

Anu Singh, NHS England’s Director of Patient and Public Voice and Insight said:
NHS England is delighted to sign up to the Shared Commitment to Engaging and Empowering Communities. The NHS Five Year Forward View sets out our vision to develop a new relationship with people and communities. Aligning the work of national agencies is critical to creating the conditions for success and delivering the ambition to reposition the nation’s health on a social, rather than biomedical model that supports people and communities to manage their health, wellbeing and care. We are looking forward to working together to help make this a reality.”

Martin Farran, Director of Adult Services for York City Council, said:
“I welcome the Shared Commitment across local government and the NHS. It’s a crucial next step to personalising people’s care and support and the “commitment” supports a community asset based approach critical to the transformation of the health and social care system.”

Dr Brian Fisher, GP and Vice-Chair of New NHS Alliance, said:
“The New NHS Alliance is committed to the key ideas and actions recommended in this document – we welcome it. In particular, we see that the NHS and local authorities need to work together with communities to help create health and build confidence and resilience. We see these approaches as essential to shift towards a greater focus of the social determinants of health, health inequalities and improving the control people have over their lives. Working on these issues with other agencies such as housing will be the next paradigm health improvement.”

Catherine Wilton, Director of the Collation for Collaborative Care, said:
“We know that things need to change- councils, clinical commissioning groups and doctors can’t ‘prescribe’ wellbeing- it comes from having friends, family, social contact and support, being able to get out and about, having the opportunity to do something for others and feeling valued for our contributions through paid and unpaid work or being part of a group.
It’s fantastic that national sector leaders are demonstrating a shared commitment to create the conditions for strong and healthy communities. With our partners, the Coalition for Collaborative Care aims to achieve change on the ground. We want to see a shift away from ‘What’s the matter with you?’ to ‘What matters to you?’ by local people and organisations coming together to nurture and build on the assets in local communities, reducing loneliness and social isolation, increasing community resilience and enabling people to take control of managing their own health.”

 

Download the Engaging and Empowering Communities – A Shared Commitment and Call to Action at http://www.thinklocalactpersonal.org.uk/Latest/Engaging-and-Empowering-Communities-a-shared-commitment-and-call-to-action/

 

Notes to editors

  • The report will be launched at the Think Local Act Personal Stand B24 at Manchester Central Exhibition Hall at 5:00pm, Wednesday 2 November. All delegates attending the National Children’s & Adults Services Conference are welcome to the launch.
  • TLAP convened a National Leaders Seminar in June 2015 which brought together key public sector system leaders including NHS England CE Simon Stevens. The aim of the seminar was to develop a shared narrative about the importance of engaging and empowering communities in achieving sustainable health and wellbeing. This was followed by regional events in which several hundred sector colleagues contributed to the narrative.
  • This shared commitment has been co-authored by all national system leaders: ADASS, Association of Directors of Public Health, Coalition for Collaborative Care, Department of Health, Health and Care Voluntary Sector Strategic Partnership, Local Government Association, the new NHS Alliance, NHS Confederation, NHS England, Public Health England, Skills for Care and Think Local Act Personal.
  • Local areas will define how they propose to effect community capacity building at local level with detailed action plans to include approaches such as co-production, asset-based commissioning and evidence-based practice.
  • National Children and Adult Services Conference takes place in Manchester Central from 2 – 4 November 2016. It is organised by the Association of Directors of Social Services (ADASS), the Local Government Association (LGA) and the Association of Directors of Children’s Services (ADCS) and is regularly attended by more than 1,000 delegates. It is vital to all with responsibilities for or interests in social care, children’s services, education, health and related fields.
  • Think Local Act Personal (TLAP) is an alliance of over 50 national social care, health and housing partners committed to improving the delivery of personalised, community-based care and support. It brings together people who use services and family carers, central and local government, major provider bodies, the third and voluntary sector and other key groups to work together to ensure people live better lives.

For more information, contact jaimee.lewis@tlap.org.uk / 07850 774453

Improving Health Care Through Better Conversation

Research shows that people often don’t take their medications or change their lifestyles after after visiting a doctor or a nurse, while only about 60 per cent of people feel they are sufficiently involved in decisions about their care.

A campaign is being launched to tackle this issue and improve the way in which health professionals and people talk.

‘Better Conversations’ looks at how clinicians and commissioners can introduce health coaching and will provide  information, evidence and tips on how to have a more equal conversation with people and are treated as partners in their care, rather than passive recipients.

It has been described by NHS Medical Director Professor Sir Bruce Keogh as an essential part of the plan to transform the way health care services are provided, to make them sustainable.

A pilot programme of health coaching was rolled out to nearly 800 clinicians across the East of England and is now ready for national adoption. The work is driven by Dr Penny Newman and backed by the NHS Innovation Accelerator initiative to achieve the aims of NHS England’s Five Year Forward View.

The purpose is to give clinicians the tools to help people to feel more motivated, confident and in control of managing their health and care through better conversations.

Dr Newman said: “The conversation between any clinician and person is paramount. I am passionate about us having conversations that enable people to thrive by feeling more motivated, confident and in control of managing their own health and care.

“Only by putting patients more in the driving seat can we enable them to better manage their own health and adopt more healthy behaviours. Since 2010 I have been gathering the evidence and developing resources in health coaching to support colleagues to work more in partnership with patients.

“If we ask patients and really listen to what matters to them, and work together to create plans that motivate them, we will improve their health and wellbeing. Behaviour change science shows that just telling people what to do often doesn’t work – we have to become more empowering. People themselves want to be more in control, listened to and heard.

“A different or health coaching approach is essential to delivering care that fits in with the individual and what’s important to them, as well as achieving efficiencies. It is my ambition and that of all our partner organisations to transform health care through enabling better conversation through health coaching.”

The campaign, ‘Better Conversation’ is supported by Health Education England, the NHS  Innovation Accelerator programme, three Academic Health Science Networks – in East of England, North West Coast and Yorkshire and Humber; and the Coalition for Collaborative Care.

A carer’s story

Mandy Rudczenko, C4CC Co-production Group member and mother to a 16-year-old  boy with cystic fibrosis explains the impact health coaching has had for them both:

“As a carer for my son with cystic fibrosis, I used to see this as a passive role, in which I was the mechanism by which the  treatment decided by clinicians was carried out. Health coaching has come as a breath of fresh air, which has enabled me and my son to engage with the management of his condition in a much more positive way.

“Cystic fibrosis requires a heavy, relentless treatment burden to stay alive. Traditional methods of ensuring treatment adherence include nagging, criticism, bullying, threats of hospitalization, and a default mode of assuming non-adherence.

“These approaches create dysfunctional working relationships between clinicians and families, resulting in resources being wasted on over-medicalisation and misdiagnosis. The critical patriarchal approach also disengages children and teenagers, often resulting in declining health during adolescence.

“I instinctively knew this approach wouldn’t work for my son. I also know that I don’t want to go to my son’s funeral – the average predicted survival age is 41 according to the CF Trust.  When health coaching came into my life I knew I had found the answer. Health coaching has given me permission to do what I had always wanted to do, but thought that it wasn’t allowed.

“I allow myself to listen to my son and enable him to set his own treatment goals. The traditional fear is that the patient, especially a child or teenager, will opt for low or zero goals; this is a myth. My son wants to carry out treatments in ways which mean something to him. He uses a nebuliser three times a day. The relentless burden of doing this every day means that the average adherence is 40 per cent. Factors affecting adherence are obviously very complicated.

“My son’s average adherence is 80 per cent because he set himself a goal to avoid having intravenous antibiotics – a regular treatment for CF – as long as possible. He knows that one way of avoiding this treatment is to keep up with the nebuliser which prevents chest infections, thus giving him the internal motivation.

“People with cystic fibrosis struggle to put on weight and are often threatened with tube feeding. They are often given a target weight to achieve by a certain date. This target can then become a disempowering obsession. Instead, my son set his own goal of taking a certain number of digestive enzymes a day, which translates into eating a certain number of grams of fat per day. He has managed to stick to this without developing an unhealthy relationship with the bathroom scales.

“Health coaching has enabled myself and my son to find ways of managing his relentless treatment regime, without the negative baggage which comes with telling someone what to do. Health coaching isn’t a luxury or an extravagance. It’s the only option for positive, humane health and care relationships.”

Her son Leo said: “I think the most helpful thing a health professional can do in a conversation is listen to me and believe what I say.”

For more information on the Better Conversation campaign, click here.

 

Shared learning workshops: Supporting Self Management and Peer Support

National VoicesWellbeing Our Way programme and Macc are hosting two Greater Manchester POW WOWs (shared learning workshops) bringing together people working in charities, wider health and care organisations, and those with lived experience to develop approaches which enable people to live well. They are a great opportunity for shared learning between staff working directly with people with long term health needs, as well as those who are commissioning and developing these approaches.

Supporting Self Management

When: Thursday 16 June, 10am – 4pm

Where: Friends House, 6 Mount St, Manchester M2 5NS

 Peer Support

When: Tuesday 28 June, 10am – 4pm

Where: St Thomas Centre, Ardwick Green North, Manchester M12 6FZ

Please click here for details and to register.

New Partnership for Shared Lives Plus and NHS England

C4CC partners, Shared Lives Plus and NHS England, are delighted to announce a new partnership to expand Shared Lives in the healthcare sector.

In Shared Lives, a Shared Lives carer shares their home and family life with an adult who needs care or support to help them live well. The approach has traditionally been social care focused, with a scheme in most local council areas, but it is expected that the funding will help expand Shared Lives within health too.

All CCGs have been been contacted by NHS England inviting them to express an interest in joining the £1.75m programme.

The applicant (or lead partner) must be a CCG or NHS Trust who might work with existing Shared Lives schemes locally, or commission new services depending on the local situation and priorities. Bids are expected to have been submitted by the end of May with a decision on 6-10 pilot areas in the Summer.

You can see more at www.sharedlivesplus.org.uk/health

Leadership for Empowered and Healthy Communities Programme – recruiting now!

Following the continued success of the Leadership for Empowered and Healthy Communities programme, new dates have been announced for the next cohort.

This innovative programme explores how leaders can grow and nurture capacity in local communities to improve health and wellbeing and ensure better outcomes for people living with long-term conditions, disabled and older people.

The programme is aimed at senior leaders and clinicians across health, social care and beyond who want to be part of a movement for change. Participants will be encouraged to think radically about the role of ‘social capital’ in health and social care and the role of public service leadership in shaping the communities that citizens need and want.

The programme involves a series of one-day workshops, action learning sets, one-to-one leadership coaching sessions, a Myers-Briggs (MBTI) analysis of personality style and a specialist 360 degree feedback diagnostic. Participants will have the opportunity to learn about best practice as well as developing the leadership skills required to embed co-production into organisations and enable strong and empowered communities to grow and flourish.

The programme, which kicks off in April 2016, is a joint venture between Thames Valley and Wessex NHS Leadership Academy, Skills for Care, Think Local Act Personal, ADASS and the Local Government Association.

The New Economics Foundation’s evaluation of the programme found, “The leadership course was regarded in positive terms unanimously by those that attended. It was described as “excellent”, “inspirational” and perhaps most crucially, has already led to new leadership behaviours in those attending.” It also found the fact that, “…most of those who attended the course had already begun to transform their role or services is evidence of the extent to which the course inspired.”

The dates are:

11th April 2016
19th May 2016
6th and 7th July 2017 (residential)
30th September
24th November

To find out more, including dates for webinars / virtual learning, click here.

To register your interest please email: Karina Croyston at karina.croyston@lehc.org.uk

Further Invitation to Tender for Financial Modelling Person-Centred Care

Together with NHS England we are inviting further applications to undertake an exciting piece of work, which supports person-centred care.

In December 2015 an invitation to tender was released to bid for a £100k grant to work on two key areas of person-centred care. Following feedback on the original invitation to tender, we-have re-issued the invitation for the work on financial modelling person-centred care.

This invitation has been slightly updated to reflect new timings and strengthens the links with the Realising the Value programme, which is separate but closely aligned.For example, see the Realising the Value ITT for specialist economic support which closes on 11 January 2016.

The lack of a robust financial case is often cited as a barrier to changing commissioning and clinical practice to provide person-centred care for people with long-term conditions.

This work will focus on financial modelling person-centred care for people with either a specific single long-term condition or multi-morbidity, estimate the opportunity for improving value through person-centred care and develop practical and simple guidance and supporting resources for commissioners and providers.

Please read the full, updated brief in full before applying.

The deadline for applications is Monday 25 January 2016. Applications and queries should be sent to england.longtermconditions@nhs.net

 

Two Exciting Grant Opportunities On Metrics and Financial Modelling for Person-Centred Care

Together with NHS England, we are inviting submissions from organisations to work on two key areas of person-centred care – financial modelling and the use of metrics.

One grant, up to the value of £100k is being offered for each project and we are looking for organisations who, (1) have the capability to identify, evaluate and support commissioners to use metrics to promote person-centred care for the growing proportion of the population with one or more long-term condition, and (2),  with the capability to develop and apply an approach to evaluate the financial case for person-centred care for people with specific, single long-term conditions and those with multi-morbidity.

Both projects should be completed on or prior to 31 March 2016.

The deadline for applications is Monday 21 December 2015 and a decision on the successful bids will be made week commencing 4 January 2016.

Applications and queries should be sent to england.longtermconditions@nhs.net

Each project has a full brief, outlining key deliverables, expected approach and scoring criteria.

For the full brief on the long-term conditions and end of life care metrics for person-centred care, click here.

For the full brief on financial modelling person-centred care for people with long-term conditions and multi-morbidity, click here.